Outils pour utilisateurs

Outils du site


issue159:tutoriel1

Différences

Ci-dessous, les différences entre deux révisions de la page.

Lien vers cette vue comparative

issue159:tutoriel1 [2020/08/02 17:42] (Version actuelle)
auntiee créée
Ligne 1: Ligne 1:
 +I know this is probably something everyone already knows, but, for clarity, and for the occasional reader who has never heard of a podcast, for the purpose of this article a podcast is a piece of Audio that has been released via the internet for listening to on an audio device at a time of the listener’s choosing. This can be a professional program that also aired on the radio, or a piece of audio content that is created by someone who wants to reach an audience for whatever reason. Many people now make a living through creation of audio podcasts, in the same way as YouTube content creators. There are many podcasts out there to meet the needs of the different interests of people, such as technology, health and fitness, food and film fandom to name a few. There are also many podcasts out there relating to Linux, and Full Circle Magazine has a weekly news podcast informing the listener of the latest Linux News. 
 +
 +My Story
 +
 +Before we start, just a little information about me and my podcasting journey. I started using Linux around 2006/7 when I started to refurbish old PC hardware (at that time Pentium 2/3 PCs. These were often made from donated PCs and parts given to me on Freecycle (now Freegle here in the UK). As many of the PC’s did not have a valid Windows license, Linux was the only viable and legal option for these PCs. 
 +
 +This was shortly after Ubuntu had become an easier route into Linux, not perfect as you still needed a little bit of knowledge to get all your audio and video, including DVD movies, to play, but way easier than it had been prior to Canonical starting Ubuntu. So I started to use Xubuntu as the OS on these low-spec machines. Often they would have the bare minimum of 196MB of Ram that Xubuntu needed, and it would have been impossible to install Windows XP SP2 as it would not have run anyway. However Xubuntu, while not lightning fast, still worked quite well on these systems. As a result of using Xubuntu on these machines, I started to use Ubuntu as a dual-boot with Windows XP on my then Pentium 4 2.5 GHz tower PC, with 2GB Ram and a 40GB HDD. A couple of years later, in 2009, I chose to only use Ubuntu after a PC meltdown requiring a total reinstall, and I have been a full-time Linux user since that time. Since 2011, I have been predominantly a Mint Mate user, although, as you will hear, I am a bit of a distro-hopper.
 +My first proper podcast was actually the Full Circle podcast, when it was still a full podcast and not a news show as it is now. For a few months, Les Pounder, John Chamberlain,​ Oliver Clark from Blackpool LUG, and myself, took over from the previous host, but, unfortunately,​ we suffered from pod-fade as, at that time, we were all in full time employment and had underestimated the amount of work involved in recording and editing a regular show. However, we had some fun, and it ignited a spark that has been rekindled in the last 3 years, first as a Hacker Public Radio (HPR) Host, and, since last October, one of the regular hosts of mintCast, which led to the creation of the Distrohoppers Digest podcast with one of my fellow hosts of mintCast.
 +
 +So the idea for this short series will be to share some of what I’ve learned over the last few years about podcasting, and how, YOU, the reader, could go about having a go for yourself. So let’s start. ​
 +
 +Required Hardware ​
 +
 +First, let us look at the hardware you need to record and edit your audio. If you want to record for Hacker Public Radio (HPR), they are more concerned on getting content and new hosts, so, as long as your audio is legible, then you are OK. For more regular podcasting, the better your audio the more likely you are to build a regular audience, so I will be taking you through the steps to get fairly decent audio quality during this series, but first let's look at the basics. ​
 +
 +If you just want to record the occasional short piece of audio, modern smartphones these days can record reasonable quality audio. You may have seen pictures of journalists chasing people in the streets, pushing their phone at them to get a quote, so if it’s a good enough option for a professional,​ it may be sufficient for occasional recording to get you started. If you have a phone with an audio jack, you can buy fairly good microphone and headphone sets that will record directly onto your phone. Also if you want to use your phone to record interviews with others, there are standalone microphones available that will do this. A little research on the web will find a number of options ranging in price from around £10 upwards, but it’s always good to read reviews of what is the best option in your price range. Also there are a number of apps that you can install from the relevant app store that will record your audio onto the phone, but more of that when we look at software. You can also buy small portable recorders that are combination microphones and recording devices and these can be used as portable recording devices or connected to a PC as an audio input device. Zoom recorders are one device that many in the podcast world use, and earlier models can be picked up quite reasonably. I personally have the H2, and a number of my HPR interview episodes have been recorded with this over the years. If recording using a desktop or laptop PC and audio quality is more important to you, you may wish to invest in a more professional microphone with a boom arm, pop filter, and vibration damper, and a hardware mixing desk, but more of that later in the series. ​
 +
 +For static recording and later editing of that or other audio, a basic laptop/​desktop PC with Linux Mint (or your distribution of choice) will be sufficient; you can also get software for basic editing on a phone or tablet, but, as I’ve never used that option, I can not really say how effective it is. For mixing long multi track audio, an i3 PC with 4-8GB Ram should be adequate for basic recording and editing. ​
 +
 +So now you know what hardware you need to get started. In the next article in this series we will look at the software you will need to use for both recording and editing any audio you have, however you recorded it. 
 +
 +TonyH1212@DigestDistro ​
 +
 +http://​hackerpublicradio.org/​correspondents.php?​hostid=338 ​
 +th@mintcast.org
 +
 +distrohoppersdigest@gmail.com
 +
 +https://​distrohoppersdigest.blogspot.com
 +
 +https://​mintcast.org/​
 +
 +http://​hackerpublicradio.org
 +
  
issue159/tutoriel1.txt · Dernière modification: 2020/08/02 17:42 par auntiee